10/27 Colloquium: Two Terreform UR books: Beyond the Square & Zoned Out!

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Date/Time
Date(s) - 10/27/2016
5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Location
Science Center Room 4102

Category(ies)


TOM ANGOTTI, SYLVIA MORSE, DEEN SHARP & CLAIRE PANETTA, PRESENTERS; SAMUEL STEIN, MODERATOR. – Hunter College – Urban Affairs & Planning a CUNY PhD Programs in EES & Anthropology.

  • “Presentation and Discussion of two books
    • Beyond the Square: Urbanism and the Arab Uprisings
    • Zoned Out! Race, Displacement and City Planning in New York City.”

books

Beyond the Square: Urbanism and the Arab Uprisings

Deen Sharp and Claire Panetta, Editors

Contributors: Khaled Adham; Susana Galán; Azam Khatam; C. Lanthier; Ed McAllister; Julie Mehretu; G. Ollamh; Duygu Parmaksizoglu; Aseel Sawalha; Helga Tawil-Souri

Beyond the Square: Urbanism and the Arab Uprisings focuses on the urban spatial dynamics of the mass protest movements that convulsed the Arab region since December 2010. The volume shifts attention away from public squares — and in particular Tahrir Square in Cairo — to consider the broader urban context in which the uprisings unfolded. The essays are topically and geographically diverse, exploring a range of sociospatial phenomena in countries that are at the heart of the Arab uprisings as well as those countries that appeared peripheral to the upheaval. This breadth of perspective highlights the centrality of space and spatial concerns to the ongoing political transformations in the region. In this way, the book provides a distinctive — and critical — analysis of one of the most significant political events of our time.

Deen Sharp is a doctoral candidate in the Earth and Environmental Sciences Program, specializing in geography, at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

Claire Panetta is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Anthropology at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

Zoned Out! Race, Displacement, and City Planning in New York City

Editors: Tom Angotti and Sylvia Morse

Contributors: Tom Angotti; Philip DePaolo; Peter Marcuse; Sylvia Morse; Samuel Stein

Gentrification and displacement of low-income communities of color are major issues in New York City and the city’s zoning policies are a major cause. Race matters but the city ignores it when shaping land use and housing policies. The city promises “affordable housing” that is not truly affordable. Zoned Out!shows how this has played in Williamsburg, Harlem and Chinatown, neighborhoods facing massive displacement of people of color. It looks at ways the city can address inequalities, promote authentic community-based planning and develop housing in the public domain.

Tom Angotti is Professor of Urban Policy and Planning at Hunter College, the Graduate Center, and City University of New York, and Director of the Hunter College Center for Community Planning & Development. He is author of New York For Sale: Community Planning Confronts Global Real Estate, which won the 2009 Davidoff Book Award.

Philip DePaolo is a long-time community activist who has been fighting issues of gentrification and poor zoning policies throughout New York City. He was formerly a resident of Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

Peter Marcuse is Professor Emeritus, Department of Urban Planning at the Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation. He has written extensively on urban planning and housing.

Sylvia Morse received her Master of Urban Planning degree from CUNY Hunter College, where she focused on housing and participatory planning. She is a lifelong New Yorker who has worked with community-based and nonprofit organizations dedicated to affordable housing, community-based planning, and racial and economic justice.

Samuel Stein is a PhD student in Geography at the CUNY Graduate Center and holds a master’s degree in Urban Planning from Hunter College. In addition to teaching and studying urban geography, he worked as a researcher, organizer, and planner on numerous New York City union campaigns, tenant mobilizations, and public policy initiatives.

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