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25

Sep
2020

No Comments

In News

By Parisa Setayesh

Prof. Cecilia McHugh joins USAC For Ocean Drilling

On 25, Sep 2020 | No Comments | In News | By Parisa Setayesh

Professor Cecilia McHugh will join the United States Advisory Committee for Scientific Ocean Drilling beginning on October 1, 2020. The 3-year appointment requires reviews of Workshops, Nominations,and Pre-Drilling Activities for the US science community.
Congratulations Prof.McHugh!
You can find more information about Prof.McHugh and her work here.

22

Sep
2020

No Comments

In News

By Parisa Setayesh

Idil Onen, Geography Student, has been awarded the Raoul Wallenberg Human Rights Fellowship

On 22, Sep 2020 | No Comments | In News | By Parisa Setayesh

First-year Geography student, Idil Onen, has been awarded the Raoul Wallenberg Human Rights Fellowship to support her project, “A Tale of Two Cities: Sur Before and After”. This project aims to analyze the urban transformation that has taken place in Diyarbakir, Turkey over the past decade, and to examine the effects of the process of urban regeneration and displacement on the residents and contest the state discourse from the perspective of the residents’ experience. Congratulations Idil! We Look forward to your work.

15

Sep
2020

No Comments

In News

By Parisa Setayesh

Prof. Diane Greenfield’s work in coastal and marine environments of Long Island South is featured on the GC

On 15, Sep 2020 | No Comments | In News | By Parisa Setayesh

Dr. Dianne Greenfield* (QC-ASRC) and her research are featured prominently on the GC website right now: “A Novel ‘Human Experiment’; Professor Dianne Greenfield studies how the COVID-19 shutdown has affected the waters of the Long Island Sound.”

Their effort is part of a year-long study, funded by a National Science Foundation (NSF) Rapid Response Research (RAPID) grant of close to $200,000, of how stay-at-home orders and the unprecedented decline in commuting and travel in the New York City metropolitan area affected the waters of Long Island Sound. Specifically, the researchers are looking at how the drop in travel — by plane, car, train, and ship — affected by the deposition of atmospheric pollutants, particularly nitrogen, in the water. They hypothesize that these changes, along with shifts in patterns of nitrogen-rich wastewater effluents, alter the biogeochemistry and ecology of the city’s coastal waters.

Still, working during the pandemic has had its challenges, Greenfield says. “We’ve prioritized the health and safety of ourselves, family, and colleagues/students while trying to remain at least somewhat productive,” she says. “Even though select — and significantly scaled-down — socially distanced activities are gradually transitioning, such as this NSF-RAPID project, my lab is still largely working remotely to maintain a safe and healthy work environment.”

For more information visit the full piece on the GC page.

15

Sep
2020

No Comments

In News

By Parisa Setayesh

Recent Alumni Dr.Aaron Davitt joins Watttime

On 15, Sep 2020 | No Comments | In News | By Parisa Setayesh

Recent graduate, Dr. Aaron Davitt (advisor: Dr. Kyle McDonald, CCNY) has taken a position with WattTime, a non-profit organization that promotes clean energy choices. He’ll be working as part of a group that is developing tools to track greenhouse gas emissions globally.

Congrats, Aaron, on your new position and this crucial work! 

 

03

Sep
2020

In Publications

By Parisa Setayesh

EES Publishes; Dr.James Biles on “A Multi-scale Analysis of Urban Warming in Residential Areas of a Latin American City: The Case of Mérida, Mexico”

On 03, Sep 2020 | In Publications | By Parisa Setayesh

Dr. James Biles of EES and CCNY has just published an article with colleague Dave Lemberg (Western Michigan University): “A Multi-scale Analysis of Urban Warming in Residential Areas of a Latin American City: The Case of Mérida, Mexico” in the Journal of Planning Education and Research.
This study represents a novel attempt to analyze the relationship between Latin American city structure and residential-scale ambient temperatures. Using statistical analysis, we assess the relationship between the type of residential zone, vegetation coverage, and housing and lot characteristics and ambient temperatures in residential areas of a large, subtropical city. We find lower temperatures in two residential areas, as well as an association between vegetation coverage and in situ characteristics. We conclude that the factors contributing to urban warming are a legacy of the study area’s unique historical geography; consequently, policy recommendations must be place-specific, integrating meso, micro, and in situ factors.

Over the summer, in collaboration with a group of community-based organizations, he also carried out a rapid appraisal of the impacts of the COVID-19 crisis on New York’s Latinx immigrant population, which was recently covered by NACLA (the /North American Congress: Reporting on the Americas since 1967/).
The study indicates that New York’s Latinx immigrants have experienced unemployment levels (69 percent) more than three times greater than the Latinx population in general. Fewer than one in 10 Latin American immigrant workers have managed to maintain their jobs and regular working hours. Nearly one quarter have seen their hours reduced. Since the vast minority of New York’s Latin American immigrant population is ineligible for temporary cash assistance and unemployment benefits, 56 percent of households report suffering a total loss of income.
The widespread loss of employment and income has had a dramatic impact on household finances. As a result of job losses, nearly 40 percent of Latin American immigrant families reported being unable to cover their basic monthly expenses. In addition, many migrant households lack significant savings. More than 40 percent of families reported having absolutely no savings and only five percent of households had sufficient funds to subsist for more than three months. For many families, lost earnings and limited savings translate into increasing reliance on credit cards and greater debt.
An inadequate policy response at federal, state, and local levels has also increased the vulnerability of New York’s Latin American immigrants. These nearly two million New Yorkers, representing 10 percent of the state’s population, tend to be significantly more vulnerable to the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic than the population at large. Despite this disproportionate burden, Latin American immigrant families do not require special treatment. As our friends, neighbors, co-workers, and fellow New Yorkers, they merely need to count and to be counted regardless of country of origin, ethnicity, and immigration status.
Read more about the work here.

26

Aug
2020

In News
Publications

By Parisa Setayesh

EES Publishes: Prof. Monica Varsanyi’s new book chapter in “Paper Trails:Migrants, Documents, and Legal Insecurity”

On 26, Aug 2020 | In News, Publications | By Parisa Setayesh

Prof. Monica Varsanyi (GC/John Jay) has just published a book chapter with her co-author, Dr. Marie Provine (Arizona State):

“Documenting membership: The divergent politics of migrant driver’s licenses in New Mexico and Arizona,” in a book volume edited by Joe Heyman and Sarah Horton, Paper Trails: Migrants, Documents, and Legal Insecurity (Duke University Press, 2020).


Across the globe, states have long aimed to control the movement of people, identify their citizens, and restrict non-citizens’ rights through official identification documents. Although states are now less likely to grant permanent legal status, they are increasingly issuing new temporary and provisional legal statuses to migrants. Meanwhile, the need for migrants to apply for frequent renewals subjects them to more intensive state surveillance. The contributors to /Paper Trails/ examine how these new developments change migrants’ relationship to state, local, and foreign bureaucracies. The contributors analyze, among other topics, immigration policies in the United Kingdom, the issuing of driver’s licenses in Arizona and New Mexico, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, and community know-your-rights campaigns. By demonstrating how migrants are inscribed into official bureaucratic systems through the issuance of identification documents, the contributors open up new ways to understand how states exert their power and how migrants must navigate new systems of governance.


Find more information here.

26

Aug
2020

In Publications

By Parisa Setayesh

EES Publishes: Prof. Dr. Nerve Macaspac (CSI) and Dr. George Andreopolous (John Jay) and Efim Galkin: “Whole-of-Nation” approach to counterinsurgency and the closing of civic space in the Philippines”

On 26, Aug 2020 | In Publications | By Parisa Setayesh

Demonstration against the Philippines’ new anti-terrorism law on July 4, in Quezon city, Metro Manila. (Photo credit: Getty Images, Source 21global.ucsb.edu)

EES doctoral faculty, Dr. Nerve Macaspac (CSI) has just published an article with co-authors, Dr. George Andreopolous (John Jay) and Efim Galkin: “Whole-of-Nation” approach to counterinsurgency and the closing of civic space in the Philippines,” Global-E 13(54).
Article Abstract:
This article focuses on the shrinkage of the democratic and civil society space in the Philippines. Specifically, it provides an analysis of the national security situation as shaped by the long-standing counterinsurgency strategy in the country, and the resulting patterns of human rights violations, intimidation, persecution of, or violence against civil society actors. Due to space limitations, it addresses only three key features of this development: (1) the role of counterinsurgency strategy, and, in particular, of its post-9/11 “whole-of-nation” approach; (2) revisions in security legislation and introduction of new counterterrorism measures; and (3) the certification and licensing of non-profit organizations.

Read more Here.

19

Aug
2020

In Publications

By Parisa Setayesh

EES Publishes: “The limits of lead (Pb) phytoextraction and possibilities of phytostabilization in contaminated soil” by Sara Perl Egendorf

On 19, Aug 2020 | In Publications | By Parisa Setayesh

EES student, Sara Perl Egendorf (advisors: Joshua Cheng, Brooklyn and Peter Groffman, Brooklyn College and ASRC), alongside Peter, Joshua, and Gerry Moore, just published one of her dissertation chapters: “The limits of lead (Pb) phytoextraction and possibilities of phytostabilization in contaminated soil: a critical review. In the International Journal of Phytoremediation.
“This review article focuses on lead (Pb), one of the most ubiquitous and harmful toxicants found in soil. Our objective is to address misconceptions regarding the ability of plants to uptake Pb through their roots and translocate it to above-ground tissues, and their ability to act as hyperaccumulators and thereby phytoextract Pb.”
You can find the article here.

16

Aug
2020

In News

By Parisa Setayesh

Covid and Cages: GC Researchers Map How Prisoners Responded to the Pandemic

On 16, Aug 2020 | In News | By Parisa Setayesh

Ph.D. student Olivia Ildefonso (left) and alumna Celeste Wilson

EES student and GC Digital Fellow, Olivia Ildefonso and EES Alum, Celeste Winston, now an assistant professor at Temple University, are featured on the GC website for their recent research that visualizes data about prison releases related to the COVID-19 pandemic, in the “COVID-19 and Cages Mapping Project”.
The incarcerated are among the most vulnerable to the coronavirus, and scholars interested in social justice see this as a convergence of two public-health issues — both the illness itself and the crisis represented by the United States’ prison population, which is the highest in the world.

“My inspiration around this project was to try to figure out how to extend the question of how do we keep people who are incarcerated safe from COVID-19, and expand that into a larger question of how to think about incarceration and police and prison abolition more broadly.”

Read more about the project here.

12

Aug
2020

In News
Publications

By Parisa Setayesh

EES student Corey Scher’s work with “Mask Watch” featured in Rolling Stone Magazine

On 12, Aug 2020 | In News, Publications | By Parisa Setayesh

Members of the New York City Police Department look on from the Midtown North Precinct as Black Lives Matter protesters march in midtown over the death of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer on June 7, 2020 in New York.(Source Rolling Stone Magazine)

EES student, Corey Scher (advisor: Kyle McDonald, CC) has been an active member of the group, Mask Watch, which documents the NYPD’s compliance (or non-compliance) with wearing masks to prevent the spread of COVID-19. His work with Mask Watch was recently highlighted in Rolling Stone Magazine.
“… a group of activists started @NYPDMaskWatch back in June to highlight police officers “actively refusing to even follow the barest and most basic protocols to protect public health and safety,” group member Corey Scher tells /Rolling Stone./Scher says the account receives a few dozen complaints a day of NYPD officers not wearing masks, and plans to use its database to author a study regarding the percentage of cops who wear masks at protests. “\The typical responses are, ‘I can’t breathe,’ ‘This is a free country,’ ‘It’s a recommendation, not the law,’” he says. (In fact, in New York state, it is a law for people within six feet of each other to wear a mask.)”

Read more Here.

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