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Publications Archives - CUNY EES

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03

Sep
2020

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In Publications

By Parisa Setayesh

EES Publishes; Dr.James Biles on “A Multi-scale Analysis of Urban Warming in Residential Areas of a Latin American City: The Case of Mérida, Mexico”

On 03, Sep 2020 | No Comments | In Publications | By Parisa Setayesh

Dr. James Biles of EES and CCNY has just published an article with colleague Dave Lemberg (Western Michigan University): “A Multi-scale Analysis of Urban Warming in Residential Areas of a Latin American City: The Case of Mérida, Mexico” in the Journal of Planning Education and Research.
This study represents a novel attempt to analyze the relationship between Latin American city structure and residential-scale ambient temperatures. Using statistical analysis, we assess the relationship between the type of residential zone, vegetation coverage, and housing and lot characteristics and ambient temperatures in residential areas of a large, subtropical city. We find lower temperatures in two residential areas, as well as an association between vegetation coverage and in situ characteristics. We conclude that the factors contributing to urban warming are a legacy of the study area’s unique historical geography; consequently, policy recommendations must be place-specific, integrating meso, micro, and in situ factors.

Over the summer, in collaboration with a group of community-based organizations, he also carried out a rapid appraisal of the impacts of the COVID-19 crisis on New York’s Latinx immigrant population, which was recently covered by NACLA (the /North American Congress: Reporting on the Americas since 1967/).
The study indicates that New York’s Latinx immigrants have experienced unemployment levels (69 percent) more than three times greater than the Latinx population in general. Fewer than one in 10 Latin American immigrant workers have managed to maintain their jobs and regular working hours. Nearly one quarter have seen their hours reduced. Since the vast minority of New York’s Latin American immigrant population is ineligible for temporary cash assistance and unemployment benefits, 56 percent of households report suffering a total loss of income.
The widespread loss of employment and income has had a dramatic impact on household finances. As a result of job losses, nearly 40 percent of Latin American immigrant families reported being unable to cover their basic monthly expenses. In addition, many migrant households lack significant savings. More than 40 percent of families reported having absolutely no savings and only five percent of households had sufficient funds to subsist for more than three months. For many families, lost earnings and limited savings translate into increasing reliance on credit cards and greater debt.
An inadequate policy response at federal, state, and local levels has also increased the vulnerability of New York’s Latin American immigrants. These nearly two million New Yorkers, representing 10 percent of the state’s population, tend to be significantly more vulnerable to the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic than the population at large. Despite this disproportionate burden, Latin American immigrant families do not require special treatment. As our friends, neighbors, co-workers, and fellow New Yorkers, they merely need to count and to be counted regardless of country of origin, ethnicity, and immigration status.
Read more about the work here.

26

Aug
2020

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In News
Publications

By Parisa Setayesh

EES Publishes: Prof. Monica Varsanyi’s new book chapter in “Paper Trails:Migrants, Documents, and Legal Insecurity”

On 26, Aug 2020 | No Comments | In News, Publications | By Parisa Setayesh

Prof. Monica Varsanyi (GC/John Jay) has just published a book chapter with her co-author, Dr. Marie Provine (Arizona State):

“Documenting membership: The divergent politics of migrant driver’s licenses in New Mexico and Arizona,” in a book volume edited by Joe Heyman and Sarah Horton, Paper Trails: Migrants, Documents, and Legal Insecurity (Duke University Press, 2020).


Across the globe, states have long aimed to control the movement of people, identify their citizens, and restrict non-citizens’ rights through official identification documents. Although states are now less likely to grant permanent legal status, they are increasingly issuing new temporary and provisional legal statuses to migrants. Meanwhile, the need for migrants to apply for frequent renewals subjects them to more intensive state surveillance. The contributors to /Paper Trails/ examine how these new developments change migrants’ relationship to state, local, and foreign bureaucracies. The contributors analyze, among other topics, immigration policies in the United Kingdom, the issuing of driver’s licenses in Arizona and New Mexico, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, and community know-your-rights campaigns. By demonstrating how migrants are inscribed into official bureaucratic systems through the issuance of identification documents, the contributors open up new ways to understand how states exert their power and how migrants must navigate new systems of governance.


Find more information here.

26

Aug
2020

No Comments

In Publications

By Parisa Setayesh

EES Publishes: Prof. Dr. Nerve Macaspac (CSI) and Dr. George Andreopolous (John Jay) and Efim Galkin: “Whole-of-Nation” approach to counterinsurgency and the closing of civic space in the Philippines”

On 26, Aug 2020 | No Comments | In Publications | By Parisa Setayesh

Demonstration against the Philippines’ new anti-terrorism law on July 4, in Quezon city, Metro Manila. (Photo credit: Getty Images, Source 21global.ucsb.edu)

EES doctoral faculty, Dr. Nerve Macaspac (CSI) has just published an article with co-authors, Dr. George Andreopolous (John Jay) and Efim Galkin: “Whole-of-Nation” approach to counterinsurgency and the closing of civic space in the Philippines,” Global-E 13(54).
Article Abstract:
This article focuses on the shrinkage of the democratic and civil society space in the Philippines. Specifically, it provides an analysis of the national security situation as shaped by the long-standing counterinsurgency strategy in the country, and the resulting patterns of human rights violations, intimidation, persecution of, or violence against civil society actors. Due to space limitations, it addresses only three key features of this development: (1) the role of counterinsurgency strategy, and, in particular, of its post-9/11 “whole-of-nation” approach; (2) revisions in security legislation and introduction of new counterterrorism measures; and (3) the certification and licensing of non-profit organizations.

Read more Here.

19

Aug
2020

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In Publications

By Parisa Setayesh

EES Publishes: “The limits of lead (Pb) phytoextraction and possibilities of phytostabilization in contaminated soil” by Sara Perl Egendorf

On 19, Aug 2020 | No Comments | In Publications | By Parisa Setayesh

EES student, Sara Perl Egendorf (advisors: Joshua Cheng, Brooklyn and Peter Groffman, Brooklyn College and ASRC), alongside Peter, Joshua, and Gerry Moore, just published one of her dissertation chapters: “The limits of lead (Pb) phytoextraction and possibilities of phytostabilization in contaminated soil: a critical review. In the International Journal of Phytoremediation.
“This review article focuses on lead (Pb), one of the most ubiquitous and harmful toxicants found in soil. Our objective is to address misconceptions regarding the ability of plants to uptake Pb through their roots and translocate it to above-ground tissues, and their ability to act as hyperaccumulators and thereby phytoextract Pb.”
You can find the article here.

12

Aug
2020

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In News
Publications

By Parisa Setayesh

EES student Corey Scher’s work with “Mask Watch” featured in Rolling Stone Magazine

On 12, Aug 2020 | No Comments | In News, Publications | By Parisa Setayesh

Members of the New York City Police Department look on from the Midtown North Precinct as Black Lives Matter protesters march in midtown over the death of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer on June 7, 2020 in New York.(Source Rolling Stone Magazine)

EES student, Corey Scher (advisor: Kyle McDonald, CC) has been an active member of the group, Mask Watch, which documents the NYPD’s compliance (or non-compliance) with wearing masks to prevent the spread of COVID-19. His work with Mask Watch was recently highlighted in Rolling Stone Magazine.
“… a group of activists started @NYPDMaskWatch back in June to highlight police officers “actively refusing to even follow the barest and most basic protocols to protect public health and safety,” group member Corey Scher tells /Rolling Stone./Scher says the account receives a few dozen complaints a day of NYPD officers not wearing masks, and plans to use its database to author a study regarding the percentage of cops who wear masks at protests. “\The typical responses are, ‘I can’t breathe,’ ‘This is a free country,’ ‘It’s a recommendation, not the law,’” he says. (In fact, in New York state, it is a law for people within six feet of each other to wear a mask.)”

Read more Here.

03

Aug
2020

In News
Publications

By Parisa Setayesh

Prof. Cary Karacas on NPR: “75 Years On, Remember Hiroshima And Nagasaki. But Remember Toyama Too”

On 03, Aug 2020 | In News, Publications | By Parisa Setayesh

A photograph shows Toyama, Japan, aflame after the U.S. attack on Aug. 1, 1945. Most of the city’s population was left homeless.(Source NPR.org)

 

On the 75th anniversary of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, EES faculty, Dr. Cary Karacas (CSI) and his colleague Dr. David Fedman, published an op-ed on the National Public Radio website, discussing their research and bilingual digital archive.
“With the 75th anniversary of the atomic bombings upon us, we would do well to retrieve the burning of Toyama from the margins of public memory. For too long, scholarly predilections and public fascination with the atomic bomb have divorced the mushroom clouds from the firestorms that preceded them.
Rather than a sideshow to the destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on Aug. 6 and Aug. 9, the incendiary destruction of cities was a fundamental facet of the war against Japan. The atomic bombings evolved out of a fierce U.S. campaign to target and destroy entire cities, in hopes of forcing a Japanese surrender.”

Read more Here.

16

Jul
2020

In Publications

By Parisa Setayesh

EES Publishes: Dr.Dax Soule in Oceanography, “Project EDDIE: Using real data in science classrooms.”

On 16, Jul 2020 | In Publications | By Parisa Setayesh

Project EDDIE Using Real Data in Science Classrooms

EES faculty, Dr. Dax Soule (Queens) recently published a column in Oceanography: Soule, D. 2020. Project EDDIE: Using real data in science classrooms. Oceanography,33(2).
“How does the earth speak to you? Or, perhaps even more importantly, how do you get the earth to speak to your students? As oceanographers, and more broadly as Earth scientists, we know that our planet has a fascinating story to tell, one that is full of an amazing array of interconnected facets. What language does it speak? How do we connect students to this story under normal educational circumstances? How about in the middle of a pandemic?

If you have found yourself suddenly needing to revise how you teach your classes and are interested in incorporating more open inquiry using real data, I would like to introduce you to Project EDDIE (Environmental Data-Driven Inquiry and Exploration; funded by the National Science Foundation. (Full disclosure: I am a principal investigator of the project.) Project EDDIE is organized by a community of STEM disciplinary and educational researchers dedicated to providing an onramp for the scaffolded1 analysis of data in the classroom. Participants include faculty from a wide range of STEM disciplines who serve a broad range of student populations at two- and four-year colleges. They create focused lesson plans using EDDIE modules that are designed to be scalable across different skill levels. An “A-B-C” structure based on how students naturally progress through learning objectives of increasing sophistication (Bybee et al., 2006) allows students to develop quantitative skills while making choices about how to use data when addressing aspects of the questions posed. In comparison to a procedure-driven laboratory where we give students questions and tell them how to answer them, EDDIE modules are structured to compel students to ask their own questions and thus become invested in finding the answers through the exploration of a publicly available data set.”

Read more here.

01

Oct
2019

In Publications

By Author on Source

EES publishes: Dr.Brian Brigham publishes study on Anthropogenic inputs from a coastal megacity’s link to greenhouse gas concentrations in the surrounding estuary

On 01, Oct 2019 | In Publications | By Author on Source

This paper by Brian Brigham and Dr. Jeffery Bird of CUNY EES. published in the journal /Limnology and Oceanography/is part of a set of three that has quantified the climate impact (i.e., greenhouse gas emissions) that come from combined sewage overflow dumped into the NYC Hudson River Estuary every year.
This very important work quantitatively links the pollution from NYC to the enhanced greenhouse gas footprint of the Hudson River Estuary. The paper is also a deep dive into the existing literature on how coastal cities affect climate change.
You can find the link to this article here.
You can also find the link to the WAMC coverage of the research here.

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09

Jul
2019

In Publications

By EES Social Media Fellow

#EESpublishes: Prof Coch with a Forensic Analysis of the 1893 NYC Hurricane: Implications for the Future.

On 09, Jul 2019 | In Publications | By EES Social Media Fellow

Professor Coch of Queens College and EES has a new sole authored article out now in the Journal of Coastal Research entitled:

Forensic Analysis of the 1893 “New York City” Hurricane: Implications for the Future.

Abstract:

Examination of an offshore-replenished beach in New York City in 1995 revealed that it contained anthropogenic debris from the distant past. Dating of the debris determined that the archeological items were deposited from a category 1 hurricane that made landfall in New York City on the nights of 23–24 August 1893. This “midnight storm” caused great damage in spite of its relatively low category on the Saffir-Simpson scale. A detailed study of the storm was conducted because it was the first hurricane to hit a major metropolitan area with many high-rise buildings. Subsequent discovery of the original weather records from New York City allowed for the re-creation of meteorological conditions in 1893, and they account for the great destruction it caused. The meteorological data were also used to conduct a SLOSH analysis that provided additional information on the storm. These analyses helped to determine why the damage was so high. The results of this study have provided valuable information for damage mitigation in future northern hurricanes.

©Coastal Education and Research Foundation, Inc. 2019
Coch, N.K., 2019. Forensic analysis of the 1893 “New York City” hurricane: Implications for the future. Journal of Coastal Research, 35(4), 729–736. Coconut Creek (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208.

03

Jul
2019

In News
Publications

By EES Social Media Fellow

#EESpublishes: Prof. John Marra has a new book on everyone’s favorite carbon isotope C14!

On 03, Jul 2019 | In News, Publications | By EES Social Media Fellow

Congratulations to our very own Dr. John Marra (EES, Brooklyn College and GC) on the publication of his new book!
Marra, John F. 2019. Hot Carbon: Carbon-14 and a Revolution in Science (New York: Columbia University Press).  
“There are few fields of science that carbon-14 has not touched. A radioactive isotope of carbon, it stands out for its unusually long half-life. Best known for its application to estimating the age of artifacts—carbon dating—carbon-14 helped reveal new chronologies of human civilization and geological time. Everything containing carbon, the basis of all life, could be placed in time according to the clock of radioactive decay, with research applications ranging from archeology to oceanography to climatology.

In Hot Carbon, John F. Marra tells the untold story of this scientific revolution. He weaves together the workings of the many disciplines that employ carbon-14 with gripping tales of the individuals who pioneered its possibilities. He describes the concrete applications of carbon-14 to the study of all the stuff of life on earth, from climate science’s understanding of change over time to his own work on oceanic photosynthesis with microscopic phytoplankton. Marra’s engaging narrative encompasses nuclear testing, the peopling of the Americas, elephant poaching, and the flax plants used for the linen in the Shroud of Turin. Combining colorful narrative prose with accessible explanations of fundamental science, Hot Carbon is a thought-provoking exploration of how the power of carbon-14 informs our relationship to the past.”

The check out the review in Nature https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01895-z


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